About your Search

20121201
20121231
SHOW
Book TV 53
( more )
STATION
FOXNEWSW 211
MSNBCW 174
CNNW 151
CSPAN2 122
CSPAN 114
FBC 40
KPIX (CBS) 35
KQED (PBS) 34
SFGTV2 34
WBAL (NBC) 34
FOXNEWS 33
KGO (ABC) 30
CNBC 29
LINKTV 29
CNN 26
CURRENT 24
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 1345
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,359 (some duplicates have been removed)
they finally make it home. >>> plus a bay area family with a son in iraq and a man who made a long journey to see his son in the war zone. all straight ahead tonight on a second look. >>> good evening and welcome to a second look. i'm julie haener. tonight far from home at the holidays. this is a tough time of year for military personnel serving overseas and their families here at home. but sometimes it's also the season for homecoming. elizabeth pran first brought us this story on christmas eve last year. >> daddy, daddy. >> reporter: an emotional reunion at naval air station woube island in washington state. >> i love you. >> reporter: the final men and lady of the yellow jacket squadron returned to their families home for good from iraq. >> just in time for christmas. >> we worked hard to make sure that happened and we're here. it's a good day i think for everybody. >> reporter: just last week a caravan of u.s. soldiers and supplies crossing the border from iraq into kuwait marking the last american combat troops to leave after almost nine years of fighting. now at fort hood texas, tear
. been a look at what is next for iraq with my coat -- then a look at what is next for iraq with michael gordon. ♪ host: good morning. it is sunday, december 30, 2012. we are less than 48 hours away from going over the fiscal cliff leaders have been working for the weekend to craft a compromise that can be agreed to before midnight tomorrow. it is now all but certain that any deal will be a far cry from the grand bargain that many leaders once imagined. as we take you through all the latest on the "washington journal," we would like to hear what you would like to say to congressional leaders on this 11th hour deal. what tax and spending issues do need included in any compromise. republicans, your number is -- democrats -- independents -- if you are outside the u.s. -- you can also catch up with us on all your favorite social media sites, twitter, facebook, or e- mail us. a very good morning to you. taking to the latest headlines on the fiscal cliff. i will run a few -- through a few of them for you. from "the daily news" -- also "l.a. times" -- i will take to "a "boston globe"" -- "the
of iraq say they are ready to make their coury a mayor player in the global oil market. they will double and quadruple oil output. businesses from arrange the world are eyeing with fresh interest. >> reporter: it holds some of the world's largest untapped reserves. basri has hosted a four day trade show. the oil market is called by some take holder as the last frontier. this exhibition hall is full of businessmen from all over the world who seek a face in this huge market. more than 350 cpanies from 45 countries took part. they may be trading cautiously but japanese business and government have a close eye on iraq as a promising future energy source. >> translator: as one of the world's largest oil producers iraq offers a wide range of opportunities. >> reporter: chinese firms were prominent. the state run oilompany has already won the contract to double up a huge oil field near the city. >> iraq is new market. it's booming for oil and gas. i see the risk. they're so nice. >> reporter: security remains precarious since the start of the 2003 iraq war. a string of terrorist attacks rock th
years and it's the first comprehensive history of the war and iraq and i think what makes it unique is i incorporate not only the views of the american policymakers but all of the iraqi leadership from maliki, their rivals, their adversaries, the former insurgents, and so i incorporated the iraqi account of what was going on as well as the american account and what is happening on the battlefield and the war in iraq. i try to put all together in one book. >> why you call it to the endgame? >> because i covered the surge and its the endgame of american military involvement and i spent the last third of the book covers the obama administration that hasn't been well covered by the media and i learned a lot from doing this and during the campaign president obama talked about the gold at the end of the war in iraq and we certainly took down the troops but what i discovered in doing the book is actually the administration policy objectives in iraq, the narrow objectives went far beyond taking out the troops that extended to remake the government and creating the power-sharing arrangement that
people have been killed in a series of explosions across iraq. dozens more wounded. kirkuk was among the cities targeted. seven people have died in bombings, all thought to be from the same family. iraq's prime minister, nouri al- maliki, is saying foreign countries are instigating sectarian division. more protests are expected in anbar province. they are demanding the release of sunni prisoners. tell us more about the explosions in iraq. who was targeted? a was carrying them out? -- who was carrying them out? >> we are getting conflicting reports about who the target was. the houses were demolished because of an improvised explosive device. one house belongs to an iraqi police officer. the other two might have been used as a place where shia pilgrims rest on their journeys towards the police city of karbala -- holy city of karbala. there might be a sectarian element in these bombings. it is not confirmed yet. other reports of violence in different parts of iraq and the eastern area -- we understand there was a local tribal chief who was killed. also, a local official targeted in the
gone to afghanistan and now i've gone twice. when i had gone to iraq as it did want to understand a little bit of what's going on there, but generally speaking we go to war. it's not that we go to war too quickly but we go to war without understanding the nation, without understanding what it means. this little boy who is not going to have a father, that woman who will never get over what happened, these fine incredible young men or women will never be. we think we know it in our hearts but it that it doesn't factor into the intellectual decision i don't think. >> very well put. i was just going to say that i would like to echo just a little bit of that and the separatioseparatio n of the military and the civilian populace is something i talk about at other times so i think that's, if you don't live in north carolina or texas or southern california, and they'll see people in uniform it was true from a growing up in buffalo new york and i got my rtc scholarship in 1995 so that was a very different culture and time. it's not that long ago but 9/11 really did change so many things an
years. it's the first comprehensive history of the war in iraq and what makes it unique is that incorporate not only use of american policymakers, but i talk to iraqi leadership. administer maliki, president talabani, rivals, adversaries so that the iraqi account as well as what's happening on the battlefield. i basically covered the war in iraq for "the new york times" for the whole conflict. i tried to put it all together in one book. >> why did you call it "the endgame"? >> well, because it's about the endgame of american military involvement and i spent the last third of the book cover and the obama administration. it's not been well covered by the media in terms of what his policy was in iraq. i actually learned a lot doing it. during the campaign, president obama talked a lot about the goal and certainly took out the troops here but i discovered in doing the book is actually the administration's own policy object is in iraq, don't object is far beyond the troops and extended to remaking the iraqi government and creating a power-sharing arrangement. it included a fa
america. still to come, or send in iraq, after nearly a decade -- orphaned in iraq, after nearly a decade now of war, and new challenges. the man who hacked into the e- mailed of hollywood actors has been ordered to pay $70,000 in damages. he admitted to charges of wire tapping and unauthorized access to a computer. prosecutors say he had access to the e-mails of more than 50 celebrities, reading film scripts and other personal information. scarlett johansson and mila kunis were among those targeted. >> he said he was almost relieved when authorities came and took his computer away after the operation. he said he was a gifted to spying on celebrities, and in court after doing a deal with prosecutors, pleaded for a deal on nine charges, including wiretapping. scarlett johansson was among those high-profile stars. new profiles she had taken of herself appeared on the internet. she agreed to go public not to highlight the intrusion. in a tearful video statement in court she said she felt truly humiliated and embarrassed by leaked naked pictures of her and called the behavior perverted and re
>> anti-government protests continued in iraq as sectarian divisions continue to deepen. hello, and welcome to al jazeera live from doha. these are our top stories. a desperate syrian father tells us why he tried to kill his own child during his escape to lebanon. 's plans be aware, china posse to force them to reveal their names. the deaf -- the members accused of the death of an gresham lawyer has been acquitted. -- russian lawyer has been acquitted. >> thousand people are in the streets in iraq to protest against the government. now, these are live pictures. the minority sunni moslem community accusing the she opera minister nora al-maliki of discrimination and refusing to share power. this is the live pictures out of northern iraq. our correspondent joins me now from the town of ramadi. the protests are very large and are continuing. they seem to have blocked a key highway. how do you assess the size of the crowds in relation to what they are demonstrating about? >> i think the rumble of the crowd is very big because the picture you are seeing is one angle. the other side o
to this video. >> now that the marine is accused of gunning down his own wife. we've got the story. >>> iraq is hit by heavy flooding, but one guy is like i need to get around. what happens when push comes to shovel. >>> it's touted as a sure-fire way to stop -- >> the crying baby! >> how to pull the trick a lot of people swear by. >> yeah, that's it. that's it. >>> and a bear decides to declutter a backyard pond. >> i'm burneding wondering if h looking for salmon, like there's got to be a salmon in my. >>> my frustrations in iraq were having to watch over 50 of my friends die, having to kill people, having to kill a child who tried to kill me. i'm a marine and we're trained to kill. we're trained that death is okay. >> what we're hearing in this video is a former marine talking about experiences serving two tours in iraq as a u.s. marine and the effects that the war had on him. >> before i went in, i was pretty much like a hippy. i was very laid back. but anger was there, it was just very hidden. after my training, it definitely amplified and got worse. >> now, this video was from 2010. it
comprehensive history of the war in iraq and i think what makes it unique is that i incorporate not only the american policymakers but all of the iraqi leadership from minister maliki, president talabani, their rivals and adversaries, satirist and so i incorporated the iraqi account of all was going on as well as the american accountant as well as what was happening on the battlefield. i covered it for "the new york times." >> uka let the "the endgame." >> because i covered the search and it's about the endgame of the american military involvement and it covers the obama administration. it is not really been well covered by the media. i actually learned a lot doing it, and it was during the campaign when president obama talks a lot about the goals and the end of the war in iraq and certainly the troops but what i discovered in doing the book was actually the administration's own policy objectives in iraq, their own objectives that went far beyond taking out the troops and extended to remaking the iraqi government and creating a power-sharing arrangement that included a failed effort to n
. >> might be interesting for this audience a few personal life is the story of iraq and talk about your own views. this is a place you knew that you traveled in the 1980's and the time of saddam hussein. you were a supporter of the war. explain why. and then i found some of the most wrenching facets of the book and discussions about what a disaster the iraq war met approved for every party in the united states most of all the iraqis. >> i knew iraq intimately in the 1980's as a reporter. i covered the war it was like a prison yard let up under saddam hussein. it was so suffocating that i can compare it to no place in the arab world about romania which i also knew to read too don't believe to go from saddam hussein's five rap to syria is like coming up from liberal humanists because we tend to say all dictators are bad, all democrats are good, you know, we eliminate and eraser distinctions and it's the distinctions that give the complexity we need to understand the world, and yet they ran a brutal dictatorship that was nothing like saddam hussein. and i had my passport taken away for ten day
military adventure in iraq." tom spent 17 years as a reporter covering the u.s. military for "the wall street journal" and another eight for "the washington post". in the course of this work, he reported on places as varied as somalia, bosnia, iraq and afghanistan, and he's been part of two teams that won the pulitzer prize. as i've gotten to know tom over these past few years, eve learned that he's that rarest of finds: a disruptive thinker whose energy and creativity combine in an interesting way. he constantly pushing us to think more nimbly and more provocatively, and that's a spirit that infuses tom's new book, "the generals." he explores generalship of good and bad. he traces the history of george marshall from world war ii, william westmoreland in vietnam to colin powell in the gulf war and to the generals who commanded in iraq from 2003 on. the generals argue that is the military's changed in the way it rewards good generalship and punishes bad and that the gulf has grown ever wider. tom's is a provocative argument and one that we will examine in some detail. joining tom is sus
much. simmering sectarian tensions have erupted into protests in iraq with thousands demonstrating in the country's western heartland. they are demanding the release of bodyguards for the sunni finance minister who were arrested on thursday. protesters say this is another example of sectarian policies. we have this report. >> a show of support for the iraqi finance minister. a defiant message from the city's upper ramadi and falluja. the local council has called for civil disobedience. thousands of blocked the highway is into iraq. they are demanding the release of nine bodyguards of the finance minister who were arrested on thursday keeping they are calling on the government to stop its sectarian approach and martin -- marginalization of their leaders. >> the situation in iraq may take a dangerous direction as elections approach. what politicians are doing is polarizing their supporters ethnically and based on sectarian affiliation. what is happening in anbar to escalate and made lead to more pressure on the prime minister. >> prime minister nouri maliki had denied the allegations
scheme was the united states embassy in oman. we're learning that al qaeda in iraq played a key role in the planning. brian todd has been investigating this story for us. brian, what are you learning? >> reporter: we're getting some disturbing new detail emerging now on a plot that was foiled by jordanian authorities several weeks ago. the group the plotters worked with, that will be familiar to many americans. and the coordinated nature of the attack brings to mind one of the most ruthless terrorist operations in recent memory. it was supposed to be on the scale of the devastating 2008 attacks in mumbai, india, when terrorists killed more than 160 people and menaced a huge city for days. this one planned to target the american embassy in the capital of one of the u.s. allies in the middle east. now there's a plot to attack ayman, jordan. jordanian officials say it was first coordinated bombings at large shopping malls in ayman. almost simultaneously, machine gun and bomb attacks on cafe and hotels frequented by diplomats and tourists. with the city's police responding to those attac
when we intervened, invaded iraq and occupied iraq. and now twelve years later we're not sure what our mission is. >> the iraq war cost more than the war in vietnam, for example, and we spend trillions of dollars once all the, the needs of veterans and service members, over two million who were deployed to iraq and afghanistan since 9/11, are met in perpetuity and their families. and so, so it's an incredibly costly thing. >> and a major milestone for the u.s. effort in afghanistan, the war is now entering its twelfth year, making it the longest running war in our nation's history. >> now as the wars in iraq and afghanistan come to a close, a frail economic climate at home has left many americans wanting to keep the troops home for good. >> the pentagon came out with new defense guidance in january 2012, which reflected the obama administration's understanding that budgets were going to be constrained first. and that second, the united states would not be likely to fight anymore wars like iraq or afghanistan in the near future, or the next decade or so. >> the point is that the america
't just the wars in iraq and afghanistan, it was daily wars with the congress, with other agencies, with the white house, and also i would say with my own building, with the pentagon. >> rose: fighting over what within the pentagon? >> trying to make the first priority of the pentagon to be successful in the wars we were already in, the pentagon bureaucracy is structured to plan for war, not to wage war, and so getting badly needed equipment to the troops fast in months rather than in years or decades was just contrary to the nature of the building and it required a lot of effort to get them to do what i thought was the right thing, whether it was fixing walter reed and the way we treated our walter reed hospital and the way we treated our wounded warriors to armored vehicles to intelligence surveillance and recon sanls vehicles and drones, medivac and so on, it was it was a struggle. >> rose: as close as i have seen you tear up is when you talk about the responsibility of those men and women in harm's way. and you have said your legacy you hope is that they. >> rose:. > had their
from iraq i've been in touch with for more than a year and a half. after the united states would not give him his visa, i asked him -- i told him about mutanabbi street and he wrote a poem and he wrote it in english, though he writes in, of course, in arabic. but this one he wrote in english. so i'll read it. one figure in the poem you should know, humbaba, which is an ogre, a monster of immemorial age. that was a special big garden, a forest, where all types of trees and flowers grew. the trees bending down gently flinging branches. our orchard grew like a crown on the sun's eyebrow. where did humbaba come from? his mother was just a cave, his father unknown. who made him a friend pretending guardian of the orchard. did those nice shrubs need fear to go begging for a garden and have humbaba in his treachery ilk. those plants and flowers were like books everyone could read, not cut and throw away. their different fantastic colors had formed our blood so our veins ran smoothly, our 7 wonders showed. then humbaba made a whirlwind of fire and snow. who crowned him king? who showed h
regulations could cause for businesses in 2013. up next. we catch up with former iraq war jessica lynch . we'll find out what she is out to and tin years by the dramatic rescue by fellow troops. >> private first clash joined. and the real education she received was in iraq where in march 23rd, her convoy took a wrong turn and ambushed by iraqis. she was captured and became the first american p.o.w. to be successfully rescued since world war ii . on april 1st, 2003 a special operation raid of u.s. army forces and army rangers and navy seals landed in iraq, the mission to take home private jessica lynch . at 1:00 they entered the iraq hospital and after securing the location they found lynch. >> are you in pain. it is okay, lynch was suffering from mental distress and severe physical energies and within minutes. lynch was on a helicopter headed for much needed medical attention and after nine days in captivity her nightmare was over. >> you are doing wonderful. >> welcome back. >> her rescue. [ applause ] >> her rescue received a lot of news coverage and she was portrayed as a hero. she will n
minutes. a story about al qaeda in iraq making a comeback including some details about the connection of these men who are accused of plotting major attacks including one on a u.s. embassy. we'll have the latest on the terror network and its role in the region. >>> do you know this woman right here? if not you will soon will. she is washington state congresswoman cathy morris rogers. new to the republican leadership. she will join us live to talk about the fiscal cliff negotiations. >>> a nightmare story straight from the subway tracks. a man pushed in front of a train. we'll have details from new york city. the second hour of "happening now" starts right now. jenna: former president george w. bush stepping into the spotlight to talk about two big topics in our country today, the economy of course and immigration. we welcome you to a second hour of "happening now." we're glad you're with us. i'm jenna lee. jon: i'm jon scott. a conference in dallas on economic immigration and growth. it highlights a story of immigrants making impact on the economy. president bush opening the event adv
advisers. >> iraq and iran, that is what upsets people about shock hegel and some of the things he had to say about them. >> he was a supporter of the war in iraq. he supported the war in afghanistan. he voted in favor. it is an odd dove. all the critics are now decrying that he supported these wars. now when it came time to redeem what is it pay losing war in iraq with the troop surge, he not only opposed it, he said it would be the worst disaster since the vietnam war, but it was a success. >> he has other problems that he will have to address. not say they are disqualified. references he made to gays that upset the human rights campaign. he will have to talk about the reference to the jewish lobby when he met the israeli lobby. he has some hills to climb. >> he has some hills to climb but i think he will climb them just fine. basically, he ended up with where most of the american people were on iraq and afghanistan. >> nina, you get the last word. merry christmas. see you next week. steves: the dramatic rock of cashel is one of ireland's most evocative sites. this was the seat of an
could summarize for us? >> it took three years. the first comprehensive history of the war in iraq and what makes it unique is i incorporate not only american policymakers but all the iraqi leadership from mr. maliki, president talibany, rivals and enemies supply inc. the iraqi account of what was going on and be accountable was happening on the battlefield. i covered the war in iraq for the new york times for the whole conflict. >> why did you call it "the endgame"? >> i covered the surge and is the end game of american military conflict and the last part of the book covers the obama administration. it has not been well covered by the media in terms of what the policy was in iraq. i learned a lot doing it. during the campaign president obama talked a lot about the goals that ended the war in iraq and took out the troops. what i discovered in doing the book is the administration's own policy objectives in iraq, narrowed objectives went far beyond taking out the troops. extended to remaking the iraqi government and creating a power-sharing arrangement, included an effort to negotiat
. >>> thousands of people protesting against bashir led government in iraq. large demonstrations have been held in the center of iraq. and replaced it to the streets over a week ago when the bodyguards of the city finance minister were arrested, accusing the prime minister nouri al- maliki of trying to break the alliance. iraq has suffered its highest rainfall in decades with many areas flooded. poor infrastructure is making the situation worse, and many are blaming the government for not helping them. >> after three days of heavy rain, the streets of the capital turned into rivers. many roads were blocked, homes flooded. the rising water adding to the misery of a population that has suffered decades of wars and sanctions. in one of baghdad's poorest areas, the people blamed the government. >> we are suffering. where is the government? where's the money going? it is going into their pockets and officials are fighting for power. suffered decadesi>> we need ser. we have nothing. it has been tenures. -- 10 years. >> and a cutter with large oil reserves, the people feel that this is not enough. ira
national securitydvisers. >> iraq and iran, that is what upsets people about huck hagel. >> he supported the war in iraq, voted in favor, and supported the war in afghanistan. it is an odd de that supported the two were that all the critics are now crying. he also, when it camtime to dean what was a losing war in iraq with the surge, he not only opopposed it he said it would be the worst disaster since the vinam war, and it was actually a success. >> he has other problems thate will have to address. references that heade to gays, he will have to talk about the reference to the jewish lobby when he met thesraeli lobby. those questions will have to be addressed. he has some hills to climb. >> he has some hls to climb but i think he will climb them just fine. basically, he ended up where most of the american people were about iraq and afghanistan. >> nina, you get the last word. mey christmas. see you next week.
and other national security advisers. >> two words, iraq and have -- iran. that is what upsets people about chuck a calamity had to say about those two. >> he supported the war in iraq, voted in favor and supported the war in afghanistan and is an odd dove that supported the two wars and all the critics are now decrying. he also, when it came time to redeem what was a losing war in iraq with the troop surge, he not only opposed it, he said it would be the worst disaster since the vietnam war, and it was actually a success. >> he has other problems, too, that he will have to address. references that he made to gays, reference about the jewish lobby when he said. when he meant the israeli lobby. those questions will have to be addressed. he has some hills to climb. >> he has some krill's to climb but he will climb them just fine. basically, he ended up where most of the american people were about iraq and afghanistan. >> nina, you get the last word. merry christmas. see you next week.
is sticking to his guns and still lying about iraq and afghanistan. find out what he says about the president's handling of the affairs in the middle east. colonel lawrence wilkerson is here to respond. >>> thanks for staying us with >>> thanks for staying us with on "the ed show." this will probably be a long-term problem for governor schneider. these workers are determined to make sure that their voices are going to be heard. labor organizers across the country and across north america are promising to fight. first, governor schneider is up for re-election. they can go after him that way. he will have to win back workers to get near the statehouse in 2014. there's also something called a statutory initiative. activists would need to collect signatures to get a new law past. those are long-term strategies, for now. but the lame duck republicans, you have to give them credit, they are succeeding. they lost eight seats in the november election. they knew they had to force this legislation through now. >> why shut people out? why did we do this? because good ideas get debated and bad ones get r
, in a very negative way of the iraq war, who has always suspected anybody who pushed that war was pushing an agenda that wasn't necessarily for a good cause, the kagans, robert kagan, fred kagan, kimberly kagan were prominently featured in your newspaper all the time, pushing the latest neo con war. now they we find out they're in bed with general petraeus, who reports to commander in chief barack obama. how did they get inside when they were from the other side idealogically? >> because, chris, four star generals have a lot of leeway when they're out halfway around the world. this arrangement wasn't well-known at the white house, at the white house. certainly if they knew they would have objected the extraordinary access that the kagans got. petraeus was able to do much of this just because he was the general. and managed to get what i understand his lawyers to sign off on the arrangement, which, you know, they got these desks, they got the security clearance, they traveled around the war zone that. >> got face time with him regularly. >> who are his people? is he part of the neo con cro
, a life lesson for one boy is now helping thousands of san diego's homeless. first, she served in iraq, now she's trying to win her battle with depression. and nine weeks after superstorm sandy, people are still suffering. when the cbs evening news continues. >> happy holidays from kabul, afghanistan, i'm p. f. c. jones from charleston, south carolina, happy new year to my family and friend back home, tops my wife and daughter in germany. i miss you, love you and will see you soon.it comes we understand. milies fa, at usaa, we know military life is different. we've been there. that's why every bit of financial advice we offer is geared specifically to current and former military members and their families. [ laughs ] dad! dad! [ applause ] ♪ [ male announcer ] life brings obstacles. usaa brings advice. call or visit us online. we're ready to help. but with advair, i'm breathing better. so now i can be in the scene. advair is clinically proven to help significantly improve lung function. unlike most copd medications, advair contains both an anti-inflammatory and a long-acting
her convoy was taken out in iraq. >> all i could see was these iraqi men bearing down on me. >> she became the first american p.o.w. to be rescued since world war ii. >> one minute i was simply a survivor at that point. >> let me correct you, you're a hero because you were there. >> jessica lynch on the challenges she faced on getting the story straight and dealing with her injuries. >> and since she ran up over $100,000 in credit card bills. >> it started small. >> author mary hunt with her cautionary tale and how to stay out of debt this christmas. and the little rockers spread some christmas cheers with a holiday hit. ♪ all i want for christmas is you ♪ >> ladies and gentlemen, governor mike huckabee. ♪ >> thank you. [applause] >> thank you very much. i think this audience is getting better, i do. and welcome to huckabee from the fox news studios in new york city. we've got a very special christmas show prepared for you tonight. and i hope that you not only enjoy it, but i hope you're blessed by it. now, you know, there's been so much hostility to people celebrating chri
of israel, lebanon, iraq, south of turkey, you're not going to be -- you cannot be the switzerland over the middle east. are going to have outside influences which usually exacerbate the situation and lengthen the time of the civil war. >> and so let's talk a little bit now, shifting the perspective, to the personal connections that you have to the house of assad. i would love for you to give us a good feel for, who is this man who is the president and how did he change over the time that you've known him? seems like there was a definitive time around 2005-2006 that you say he shifted. please walk us through that. >> again, i first started meeting with president bashar in 2004. i found him to be very welcoming, very unpretentious, self-depricating even, and i never saw him in the mold of a moammar gadhafi or saddam hussein. that's the group he is associated with these days and not a very good group to be associated with. and many people who have met all three -- i did not immediate gadhafi or saddam hussein but but assad was different, relatively normal, and he brought people in that ga
in iraq. the two of and what we do, would put the caboose before the engine and then we have the train wreck. we never figure out what comes first. the secure environment, or legitimate governments, or does the individual, military did education and training? -- education and training? i agree that you have to start at the provincial and district level. which is the right model to go with here? mr. affleck, you talked about 27 different militia types of groups. when we try to focus on couple, which does not -- kabul, which is not extent beyond the city limits. what has to come first for us to be on the track to success? >> it to get international security assistance peace right and you have african nations, including uganda and rwanda and participate, that gives you some breathing space to move on. that is the essential thing that first. to happen first brok >> you have to deal with governments, but obviously creating greater security -- >> governments at which level? "you cannot frankly do real governance of the provisional level with governors unless you're dealing with the capital,
calling for the deaths of american troops serving in iraq. in his apology he said his performance was emotionally charged and, "while i'm grateful for the freedom to express one self, i learn there is some limits to what language is appropriate and i'm deeply sorry for how these lyrics will be interpreted. i will forever be sorry for any pain i have caused by those words." >>> we've got much more ahead this hour. here's a look at what's coming up. >>> it was the picture that spark eed outrage. what the photographer that snapped that disturbing subway photo told cnn about that moment. >> all of those who argued for nonintervention because of the things that might happen have now happened because we failed to intervene. >>> when is enough enough? that is the question many are asking about syria as the death toll climbs and concerns mount over chemical weapons and now lawmakers are saying it may be too late to stop mass destruction. >>> have a question about the fiscal cliff? we have answers. our expert explains how going over the fiscal cliff will affect your bottom line. two years
. but to have this policy to iraq have a million children have died and then after 9/11 fed is continue. and greasy the lions running from 8098 from 18980 iraq and afghanistan to the current administration. >> with your book the untold history of the united states. >> but what we are said is not told to the university audience but it is told in the public schools are those who get history from television so that is what we try to challenge. a report card last year but also to look at math and science with high-school seniors show proficiency in u.s. history. that the report said only 2 percent can explain what brown feet board of education was about even though it was implicit our kids don't know much history. what they do know is wrong. it is based on the work of greater science. but we have a big sweep because we could couple this with the showtime documentary to make it more dramatic. >> just like a basic text history 101. these books are not coherent. there is no pattern. we don't understand how that works. to some degree the united states always comes out ahead or okay. >> if you t
at camp pendleton in california around on the battlefields of iraq. >> i got to do a lot of things that i know not many other female marines got to do. >> in december of 2006 while on patrol during their second deployment the lives of these two marines changed forever. >> we were clearing the road and some insurgents were watching us from a roof top a little ways away and when we got to a certain point they detonated an ied that was buried in the road. i was knock unconscious and thrown a couple of feet. when i woke up i was like please, be on the end of the leash and don't be hurt. rex hurt his right shoulder so he had a hard time walking. we both have like post traumatic stress from iraq. he was really a changed dog after that. >> megan suffer ised a traumatic brain injury from the attack. after recovering she retired from the marines and moved back home to new york. >> i tried to adopt rex. fortunately for the marine corps but unfortunately for me he got better and he was still able to work and he is a good asset for the marine corps. >> their working life right now is 8 to 10 years. >
in iraq. i find it hard to believe that egypt, as important as it is, not as important as it once was, that anyone can really allow these people to do this. i think that they are willing to look at how if there is money to be had for them. clearly, the process to start with the degree of november 22, the same thing with this constitution. the constitution has been subject to so much. now, the effort to ram it through this very quick shotgun referendum, the regime says this will observe and the problem is both. it is the effort put this into the previous era. why now? it's funny. to me, they have just been itching to do this for a long time. those conversations that i had, when i was in egypt over the summer, it was good to me that they were looking for opportunities to do it. in sequence, they found it in sinai in august. they found the opportunity to weigh with the upper echelon of the military and security system. .. so it seemed to me that once again there is a tremendous opportunity. but this is something they've been looking forward to doing for quite some time. [inaudible] >> th
.s., how it exists? >> in the u.s., for instance, after the invasion of iraq one of the major construction or reconstruction quote unquote ventures was, you know, commissions, somehow, or given somehow to various corporations that are very much in touch or close to or part of the network of, for instance, vice president dick cheney. whether it's halliburton, other companies, they ended up unfairly taking up these and they didn't do a good job at all by virtue of the result -- [inaudible]. these can networks -- another can of such network, if you would like to look at the much bigger scale, the entire seven to $800 billion bailout is a function of a very quote unquote legal state business network that operates that allows our system to bail out people that have caused the problem under legal pretense. the issue is in countries like syria. the money is much smaller, and the checks and balances that what is the media or the democratic process, and other civil society associations and power centers is absent, completely absent. so even though the pot is smaller, divided in an even much more an
of the surge in iraq, which succeeded in iraq, but he did not give -- i am not sure weather it would have had any chance, but he supplied a number of troops much lower than with the commanders had asked for. it was supposed to be a sequential operation. the south and in the east. in the end, he decided to end the search before doing east. i still think, given how unpopular the taliban are in afghanistan, there is no assurance that are going to retake the country. i think what will happen is a return to the civil war, the no. alliance against taliban when we leave, and i think we cannot leave soon enough. >> what we have seen is the emergence of at least, by our standards, a more civilized and humane society with our encouragement, with our stewardship, with our protection, and with our muscle, and the real probability if not likelihood, maybe inevitability, that when we withdraw, that they will revert to the punishment of women, the failure to educate, and i think that weighs on our conscience, but that is not justification for a war, and it certainly does not meet the test -- >> i believe i
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,359 (some duplicates have been removed)